Archive for

How Master The Provencal Home Look

To master the Provencal home look is all about using colours, textures and patterns taken from the French country side. To see the beautiful country side of Provence without actually visiting you can google the word “Provence” and look at the images. You will see a lot of yellow, greens, purples and golds which are the colour schemes you need to be looking at. You can get some beautiful fabrics with these colour schemes and Provencal designs for tablecloths, curtains and throws.

With regards to furniture you need to use as much natural wood items as possible and iron accessories. Wooden furniture with iron handles look the part. You can get some old furniture and do it up yourself by stripping down the paint to show the natural wood and then adding iron or metal knobs.

Seating should be comfortable in natural colours with bright coloured flower patterns on cushions. Living room accessories which will set off this look include picture frames made of natural materials; wicker baskets and candle stick holders make a nice touch. Fresh flowers are also a strong feature of a Provencal home so make sure you always have fresh flowers on display. As well as looking fabulous they will also make the rooms smell beautiful.

Now for the most important room in a Provencal home, the kitchen! This room should have a lovely aroma of herbs as you walk into it. Accessories in the kitchen should be brightly coloured and all handmade. French dishware comes in lots of different unique patterns and colours which will set the room off perfectly. Provencal tablecloths will make your dinning or kitchen table look really authentic. Some of the tablecloths on the market today are coated with Teflon which is a plastic coating which means any spillages are simply wiped away.

To sum up this look is really all about bringing the outside indoors. The look is charming, romantic, and very elegant. Comfy and casual are other words which spring to mind. If you really want to get a feel for what you should be creating, take a trip to Provence in the Spring time and see the beautiful spring flowers which form the country scenery.

Education Sector: Some Practical Suggestions For Interior Design

Approaching interior design for the education sector demands a careful approach. Whereas in your own home you can let your taste guide your way and your budget set your limits, buying for a room you will not use presents very different considerations. This article offers a brief look at what you need to consider when buying for interiors in a residential education setting.

Taste
The first casualty of buying interiors that others are to live in is your own taste. When choosing the right look you need to jettison your taste, or at least as much as you can. Consider the age-group of the residents and how much time they will spend in the accommodation. Hotel room design is a good starting point, as although this will be the resident’s home for a while it still retains the generic needs of a hotel room, in that the main aim is to be as neutral as possible. You cannot possibly cater to all tastes so it is better to at least offend as few as possible. If you have a child of the same age-group or a member of your wider family that is a student then ask them to take a look at some ideas of fabrics and colours to see what they like, or failing that find out what they really dislike. There are specialist companies that supply both the hotel industry and the education sector and these websites can be not only a good starting point but a cost-effective source for your needs.

Safety
There are strict fire regulations around what is called ‘sleeping accommodation’ when it is provided as a service. Make sure you have read the current regulations and follow the rules on fire-retardant bedding, curtains and furniture. Again, a reputable company that is set up to supply to the hotel or education sector will have all products clearly marked for their fire-retardant qualities.

Function
The key phrase here is ‘hard-wearing’. Children and young adults have rarely ever bought their own bedding or curtains and this means they will not respect its cost or its care. There is no point in putting your faith in rules, except the rule that you should plan for disrespect of the room you provide. Buy products that are hard-wearing and even if the initial cost is higher this will save money in the long-term.

Also, keep in mind that the rooms you will buy for are, in part, for studying. If it is a higher education setting then the room will be a primary location for the student’s reading and computer use. Colours, lighting and the placement of furniture should fit the function of a room where reading will be a daily activity. For a private boarding school environment little extras like black-out curtain linings can add something to the design of a room, demonstrating consideration for a child who might struggle to sleep away from home.

Costs
In the current economic times cost consideration is more important than ever. If you are fitting out a number of rooms then of course it is best to buy in bulk from one supplier. The more items you can source from one place the stronger you can negotiate on price. All rooms needn’t be the same, though, you can theme rooms by breaking them into three or four groups so that adjoining rooms are differently accented in colours and fabric patterns. Fire retardant fabrics can be expensive when bought from the household name shops, so again look to firms that understand the budget constraints of buying for the education sector.

Buying Art For Your Home

It often seems to me that we view works of art in a particularly unique and individual manner. You may look at a particular piece and really love it, but a friend or family member may take a real dislike to the same composition. This is, in a way, part of what makes art so fascinating.

It might also be said, however, that it does throw up a few problems. I think that one of these can be seen when you are choosing items for your own home. This can certainly be a difficult task, partly because you will usually have multiple aims in mind.

On the one hand, you’ll undoubtedly be looking to select something that you like and that you believe that you will enjoy for some time to come. You certainly don’t want to decorate your own home with an item that you really don’t like!

But it’s also easy to see how some people stumble into the issue of making really poor decisions in this area. This comes about due to thoughts about pleasing others. Instead of thinking about our own wishes, it becomes fairly easy to start considering others.

Although this may be seen as being a healthy approach to life, it’s also not without its difficulties. What happens if you see a painting, for example, that you really love? Is it enough to buy it and to ensure that it is placed in a suitable position within your own home?

What happens if you have a fear of the fact that visitors to your home may not think that you have made a suitable selection? I think that there are a number of issues that are raised here. One of them is that it’s always difficult to second-guess the reactions of others.

In a sense, this recalls a point that I made at the very outset of this article. If we all have different reactions to artworks, then how can you possibly predict how other individuals will react? But this is not the only issue that is to be considered.

You also need to realise that it will be impossible to please everyone who sees an individual piece. In fact, it’s worth remembering that plenty of people won’t like the item that you select. When it comes to art, this is very much the reality of the situation.

So where does this leave you? My own feeling here is that you should make decisions that are based on your own views. This does, at least, ensure that things are kept nice and simple.